Reptiles

 

 

 

 

 

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Reptiles

 

It is extremely difficult to tell if a turtle or a snake is an orphan since their parents don’t care for their young or ‘feed’ them.  In general it’s safe to assume that moving it out of harms way (e.g. away from the middle of a busy roadway) is sufficient.  They are equipped to find food on their own. 

 

Not every turtle you find lives in a body of water.  Once a turtle or snake hatches, it instinctively knows where to go to find appropriate habitat, so it’s best to leave them if they appear to be uninjured.

 

Should you be lucky enough to find a nest of turtle eggs that are hatching, leave them be.  They will hatch and know where to go on their own.

 

You should never release any pet store turtles or snakes that you bought, into native bodies of water or streams.  Nor is it wise to move a turtle into a pond or stream if you are unsure that is where it originated from.  You can cause ecological harm in doing so to the other reptiles that inhabit that space.  Always check with a wildlife rehabilitator before you inadvertently do anything to harm our native wild populations.

 

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Last modified: 09/23/16 08:17 PM